‘Saving the Amazon’: Conservation, International Covetousness, and the Politics of Research

My latest article has just been published in Anthropology Today. If you’d like a copy, feel free to email me. Here’s the abstract:

Many justifications have been made for ‘saving the Amazon’ from preserving the ‘lungs of the world’ to protecting unknown botanical wonders that might yield cures to deadly diseases. However, Amazonians have responded to these claims with charges of ‘international covetousness’, interpreting such foreign interest as a thinly-masked desire to take control of the region’s natural resources. In this article I examine some of the counter-claims that have emerged in Brazil that reflect Amazonians’ uneasiness with such foreign interest in the region. Drawing from my own engagement with rural Amazonians, I share their critiques of the deep global inequalities that they see in conservation efforts and international research in Amazonia. To conclude, I discuss the value of ethnography and anthropological inquiry for encouraging grounded views of Amazonia that challenge abstracted notions of the region, including that of the monolithic rainforest in need of ‘saving’.

Social Networks and Manioc Diversity – New Publication in Current Anthropology

My latest research article (co-authored with Chris McCarty and Charles Clement) is to be published in the December 2013 issue of Current Anthropology. It’s already available ahead of print through JSTOR. This is the abstract:

Social exchange networks play a critical role in the maintenance and distribution of crop diversity in smallholder farming communities throughout the world. The structure of such networks, however, can both support and constrain crop diversity and its distribution. This report examines varietal distribution of the staple crop manioc among rural households in three neighboring caboclo communities in Brazilian Amazonia. The results show that the centrality of households in exchange networks had no significant correlation with the number of manioc varieties maintained by households. However, household centrality did show a significant correlation with households’ perceived knowledge of manioc cultivation as well as the total area of manioc they cultivated. Although households with the most knowledgeable and active producers played a central role in the distribution of planting materials and manioc varieties, they did not maintain higher varietal diversity than more peripheral households in this study. This case study represents an important example of how social networks can constrain varietal distribution and contribute to low crop diversity in agricultural communities.

Say ‘Hello’ to the 100 trillion bacteria that make up your microbiome

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Journal Club

Say ‘Hello’ to the 100 trillion bacteria that make up your microbiome

Thanks Nick Kawa, for bringing Michael Pollan’s extensive article on gut ecology in NY Times Magazine to our attentionThe article summarizes work from a number of labs researching the role of gut ecology on human health, a topic that has become quite popular in the media and scientific literature, particularly in the context of fecal transplants (e.g. NPR, NY Times, The Lancet Infectious Diseases).

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Ethiopia’s Church Forests

Forests have been planted around Ethiopian Orthodox churches since the early 13th Century. Unfortunately, in areas that are experiencing massive deforestation, these sacred forests are some of the only remaining islands of forest still left intact. To learn more, read the blog post from PLoS One here:  http://blogs.plos.org/blog/2011/02/25/church-forest/