‘Saving the Amazon’: Conservation, International Covetousness, and the Politics of Research

My latest article has just been published in Anthropology Today. If you’d like a copy, feel free to email me. Here’s the abstract:

Many justifications have been made for ‘saving the Amazon’ from preserving the ‘lungs of the world’ to protecting unknown botanical wonders that might yield cures to deadly diseases. However, Amazonians have responded to these claims with charges of ‘international covetousness’, interpreting such foreign interest as a thinly-masked desire to take control of the region’s natural resources. In this article I examine some of the counter-claims that have emerged in Brazil that reflect Amazonians’ uneasiness with such foreign interest in the region. Drawing from my own engagement with rural Amazonians, I share their critiques of the deep global inequalities that they see in conservation efforts and international research in Amazonia. To conclude, I discuss the value of ethnography and anthropological inquiry for encouraging grounded views of Amazonia that challenge abstracted notions of the region, including that of the monolithic rainforest in need of ‘saving’.

Ethiopia’s Church Forests

Forests have been planted around Ethiopian Orthodox churches since the early 13th Century. Unfortunately, in areas that are experiencing massive deforestation, these sacred forests are some of the only remaining islands of forest still left intact. To learn more, read the blog post from PLoS One here:  http://blogs.plos.org/blog/2011/02/25/church-forest/