The Other Side of Our Food System

I just published a short blog post for Ohio State’s Initiative for Food and Agricultural Transformation (InFACT), which discusses my new research on the use of biosolids (i.e. treated sanitation sludge) in Midwestern agricultural landscapes.

El Tunchi

While living in the Peruvian Amazon, I heard several stories about “el tunchi” — a spirit of the dead that has to pay penance in this world. The Tunchi is said to retrace the steps of its past life, disturbing the living by moving furniture, displacing objects, or producing eerie whistling sounds. For the forthcoming issue of Anthropology and Humanism, I wrote a short piece about a tunchi that harrassed an acquaintance named Sandra. You can read it here.

The Irony of the Anthropocene

I just published a short essay with The Conversation that outlines some of the inherent contradictions and ironies in the Anthropocene. Despite the common portrayal of humanity as the dominant force on the planet, I argue that the Anthropocene is rooted in a growing realization that we are in a state of ecological crisis that defies our control.

Shit

I wrote a short essay titled “shit” that was just published on Cultural Anthropology’s website as part of their series Lexicon for an Anthropocene Yet Unseen. Other additions to the lexicon include: carbon, heat, species, and zoonosis.

A brief teaser from my contribution: “The Anthropocene will offer many lessons for humanity, but one of its most jarring is that we simply can’t hide from our shit any more.”

The Urban Amazon

For the past year, I’ve been toying with the idea of writing a short book about the urban Amazon. Most of what is written about Amazonia is focused on its forests and rivers, its flora and fauna. When people are discussed, most often it’s indigenous groups living in isolated reaches of the region, or those who are fighting against bulldozers and dams that threaten their livelihoods and even their very lives. I don’t want to detract from any of those struggles. They might matter now more than ever. But today, it’s usually overlooked that the bulk of Amazonians live in cities, and little of the media coverage that circulates outside of the region is focused on their lives.

Here I offer a brief introduction to the urban Amazon, and more specifically, the Amazonian city of Manaus:
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Cobra Grande

puruzinho e guariba - nov. 3 2009 085A short essay of mine was just published in Engagement, the blog of the Anthropology and Environment Society. The piece examines the story of Cobra Grande, a massive snake of Amazonian folklore that is implicated in the region’s ever-shifting hydrological landscape. I argue that Cobra Grande is more than just a quaint folk tale, but rather a central Amazonian metaphor that reminds that our surroundings are in constant flux, and that humans are not the only ones responsible for this ongoing transformation.